OPEN STAGES ONLINE: The Red Thread of Blood Wedding

by Walter Bilderback, Production Dramaturg

A week ago or so, I had a realization in rehearsal: Fate is almost an invisible character in Blood Wedding, but we weren’t acknowledging its presence. The concept is almost alien to American popular culture, with its emphasis on individualism, self-help and self-improvement, but the action of Blood Wedding barely makes sense without recognizing its power. (Questions about these assumptions seem to be emerging as a recurrent theme in this year’s plays. I’ll be talking more about this with both Passing Strange and Passage.) Fate, as it appears in Blood Wedding, is something ultimately beyond individual choice, moral or otherwise.

Lorca in Granada in 1919, aged twenty-one.

The word appears multiple times in Blood Wedding. In a completely traditional production of the play, Fate is even represented onstage, in a ball of red thread children play with. The classical world saw a human life as a thread cut off by impersonal, outside forces. The length and shape of a life was pre-determined. The individual’s responsibility was to live the best life within this pre-determined shape: attempting to resist or evade it was a cause of tragedy. Sophocles’ Oedipus is a prime example. His parents’, and then his own attempts to avoid the prophesied curse places him in the path of his father and the bed of his mother, with disastrous results not only for the three of them but for Thebes as well. In the same way, Leonardo and the Bride attempt to resist their fate and cause greater damage to their community.

Lorca adds a twist to this in Blood Wedding. One sort of fate seems to hang upon the dryland village where the play takes place, the same sort that hung upon the peasants Lorca had seen as a child – an endless cycle of struggle, loveless marriages, violence, and social convention. Against this is a different sort of fate hanging over the Bride and Leonardo, an individual fate thwarted because of Leonardo’s poverty. Many biographers see echoes of Lorca’s life as a gay man in a conservative, patriarchal society in Blood Wedding. Lorca scholar Gwynne Edwards sees “Lorca’s growing belief that one should be true to one’s nature, whatever one’s sexuality” as an important theme of the play. As director Csaba Horvath has pointed out in rehearsals, all of the play’s characters want to conform to their society’s demands: it is the tension between that and the red thread of Fate which creates tragedy for the entire community.

Blood Wedding begins October 25. Get your tickets at WilmaTheater.org/BloodWedding

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